Jaysun's Journal

Independent Baptist

Matthew 2


Chapter

2

1 Now when Jesus was born in Bethlehem of Judaea in the days of Herod the king, behold, there came wise men from the east to Jerusalem,

In the book of Exodus, God’s people had been in Egypt for over four hundred years. In all that time, over four centuries, the Lord never sent them a prophet or even a message from Heaven. Then one day the children of Israel began to cry out for deliverance. They had been slaves to Pharaoh for many years. But it wasn’t until they began to groan under weight of their burdens that God sent them a deliverer whose name was Moses

The life of Moses, his birth and ministry parallels that of our Lord Jesus Christ. For instance, when Moses first revealed himself to his fellow Israelites, he was rejected; likewise with Christ at His first advent.  Both of them did great miracles and brought salvation through the blood of the lamb.  When Moses was born, along with being under the rule of a foreign government, multitudes of innocent children were being slaughtered.  What am I getting at?  I’m saying I believe the second coming of Christ will in many ways be similar to the first coming. That being said, I want to look at the conditions in Christ’s day and then compare them to our own.

First of all, in vs. 1, there were very few wise men left! In fact, these had to be imported from the East. (By the way, we generally think of “three” wise men, but the Bible does not say how many there were.) Though it is hard to imagine wise men coming from the land of Iraq, these men were probably from Babylon[1] and had knowledge of Daniel’s seventy weeks (Dan 9:24).

I believe the Bible calls these men “wise” for two reasons. First of all, vs. 2 says, after they saw his star, (after they ‘saw the light’) they came “to worship him!” Today wise men still worship Him! Secondly, I believe they were called ‘wise’ because they feared God.   That is not in our text but Psalm 111:10 says, “The fear of the LORD is the beginning of wisdom.”  You don’t even come close to wisdom until you fear God.  And if America lacks anything today, it is the fear of our God.

2 Saying, Where is he that is born King of the Jews? for we have seen his star in the east, and are come to worship him.

In the Old Testament, the first question God asked of man is, “Where art thou?” (Gen 3:9)  In the New Testament, the first question man asks was “Where is he…?”[2]

“His star in the east…”[3] After studying the nativity story, my mom confessed she had always assumed the lady’s group known as the Eastern Stars had something to do with the star of Bethlehem. She was mistaken.   These men were in the East when they saw His star.  That would have made it, if anything, a western star. Cults like the Eastern Stars, Masons, Shriners, Ku Klux Klan, etc. have nothing to do with the Babe in the manger.

3 When Herod the king had heard these things, he was troubled, and all Jerusalem with him.

The Herods were an Edomite line of kings, who, under Rome, got control of Judea shortly before Christ. Herod the Great (37-3 B.C.),[4] got his throne, and kept it, by crimes of unspeakable brutality, murdering even his wife and two sons. He was cruel, cunning, coldblooded. It was he who slew the children of Bethlehem in an effort to kill Christ. His son, Herod Antipas, some 33 years later, killed John the Baptist (Mark 6:14-29), and mocked Christ (Luke 23:7-12). His grandson, Herod Agrippa I, 14 years still later, killed James the Apostle (Acts 12:1-2). His great grandson, Herod Agrippa II, 16 years later, was the king before whom Paul was tried Acts 25:13-26:32). (4)

4 And when he had gathered all the chief priests and scribes of the people together, he demanded of them where Christ should be born.

5 And they said unto him, In Bethlehem of Judaea: for thus it is written by the prophet,[5]

Herod was told to look for Jesus in Bethlehem.  “Bethlehem” means the House of God or a place of bread.  If a man is looking for Jesus, he ought to be able to find Him at the house of God.  Herod, however, did not seek the Lord for the right reasons.

6 And thou Bethlehem, in the land of Juda, art not the least among the princes of Juda: for out of thee shall come a Governor, that shall rule my people Israel.

Herod “had gathered all the chief priests and scribes of the people together.”  This is one of the most striking parallels between Christ’s day and our own.  Herod gathering all the religious leaders together reminds me of the Ecumenical[6] movement infesting churches today. It seems like every time you turn around, some spiritually-retarded Church wants to get everybody together.  Baptists, however, have always been diametrically opposed to everything the Roman Catholic Church stands for.

Recently, the news media (Fox) has been lambasting John Hagee for calling the Catholic Church a “Great Whore.”  In fact, the Bible calls the Catholic Church a “great whore” and a “mother of harlots” in Revelation 17.

Dr. Sightler used to say, “There’s strength in division” and he was right.  I would still rather be divided by truth than united by error. The Bible says, “…come out from among them, and be ye separate, saith the Lord…” (2Cor 6:17) But for some reason, many professing Christians don’t see a thing wrong in fellowshipping sixteen different faiths.

By the way, let me throw this in; Baptists are not Protestants.  We did not come out of the Catholic Church.  We never were part of it.  Before Martin Luther or John Calvin ever came along, there were men standing up with a Bible saying, “What can wash away my sin?  Nothing but the blood of Jesus!”   No, the name “Baptist” does not go all the way back to the days of the Apostles.  But down through the ages, there have been men who believed the basic tenets of what we believe today.  Unfortunately, the established church of their day persecuted them, branded them as heretics, and forced them into obscurity.  Baptists need to read books like J.M. Carroll’s Trail of Blood or Fox’s Book of Martyrs and develop some doctrinal backbone.

But notice something about the ecumenical movement in our text. In Vs. 2 the wise men saw His star in the east. We read elsewhere, that shepherds saw it. However, we don’t read where Herod, the Scribes, or the Pharisees ever saw the light!  The religious crowd knew about Jesus. In fact they told Herod where He would be born.  But we don’t read where they ever looked for Him much less found Him. Might I say that the prominent, so-called preachers; the Joel Osteens, Jim Bakers, and the Oral Roberts may know a lot about God, but they’ve never met God!

7 Then Herod, when he had privily[7] called the wise men, enquired of them diligently what time the star appeared.

8 And he sent them to Bethlehem, and said, Go and search diligently for the young child; and when ye have found him, bring me word again, that I may come and worship him also.

Note: when Jesus came the first time, the country was governed by two-faced lying politicians[8].  Herod made out like he loved God and he loved children, but in reality, he was a devil! He told the wise men to find Him because he wanted to worship Him too!  But Herod didn’t care a thing about that little baby, he didn’t care about the wise men, he just told them what they wanted to hear in order to get the information he wanted.

9 When they had heard the king, they departed; and, lo, the star, which they saw in the east, went before them, till it came and stood over where the young child was.

Broadus says it was common in the East to travel by night and avoid the heat of the day. (9)

10 When they saw the star, they rejoiced with exceeding great joy.

These wise men were perhaps the first Gentiles to worship Jesus.  What a privilege.

11 And when they were come into the house, they saw the young child with Mary his mother, and fell down, and worshipped him:[9] and when they had opened their treasures, they presented unto him gifts; gold, and frankincense, and myrrh.

“Into the house:” Apparently then, some time had elapsed as the scenery changes from a stable to that of a house.  In fact, judging from Herod’s orders in vs. 16, Jesus was probably around two years old at this time.

Notice, the wise men did not give gifts to Mary. They gave gifts to Jesus. God knew that Joseph and Mary were poor.  Without these gifts, especially the gold, they probably wouldn’t have been able to afford their escape to Egypt (Vs. 14).

12 And being warned of God in a dream that they should not return to Herod, they departed into their own country another way.

After “being warned of God” the wise men didn’t go back the same way they had come.  They went “another way.”  There’s a whole lot in that verse.  After you meet Jesus you will walk another way too!  It will change your direction.

13 And when they were departed, behold, the angel of the Lord appeareth to Joseph in a dream, saying, Arise, and take the young child and his mother, and flee into Egypt, and be thou there until I bring thee word: for Herod will seek the young child to destroy him.

Notice, after the marriage, divine directions are given to the man and not Mary.

14 When he arose, he took the young child and his mother by night, and departed into Egypt:

They left by night, indicating that Joseph wasted no time in heeding God’s warning.

15 And was there until the death of Herod: that it might be fulfilled which was spoken of the Lord by the prophet, saying, Out of Egypt have I called my son.[10]

16 Then Herod, when he saw that he was mocked of the wise men[11], was exceeding wroth,[12] and sent forth, and slew all the children that were in Bethlehem, and in all the coasts thereof, from two years old and under, according to the time which he had diligently enquired of the wise men.

With all the other signs of His soon coming, isn’t it strange that when Jesus came the first time, the mass murder of children was sanctioned by the state?   Today, there are some who believe certain situations exist where abortion might not be that bad.  People with this mentality can be found, even among professing Christians.  What do you think?  Would you consider abortion in any of the following four situations?

(1.)     There’s a preacher and wife who are very, very poor. They already have fourteen children, and now she finds out she’s pregnant with the fifteenth. They’re living in tremendous poverty. Considering their poverty and the excessive world population, would you consider recommending an abortion?

(2.)     In one family, the father is sick and the mother has tuberculosis (TB). Of their four children; the first is blind, the second recently died, the third is deaf, and fourth has TB. The mother finds that she’s pregnant again. Given their extreme situation, would you consider recommending an abortion?

(3.)     A white man has raped and impregnated a thirteen-year-old black girl. If you were her parents, would you consider recommending an abortion?

(4.)     A teenage girl is pregnant. She’s not married. Her fiancé is not the father of the baby and he is highly upset. Would you consider recommending an abortion in this situation?

If you said yes to the first case, you just killed John Wesley, one of the great evangelists in the nineteenth century. If you said yes to the second case, you killed Ludwig van Beethoven. If you said yes to the third case, you killed Ethel Waters, the great black gospel singer who thrilled audiences for many years at Billy Graham Crusades around the world. And, if you said yes to the fourth case, you killed Jesus Christ. (5) Would you have killed anybody important?

Isn’t it strange the same bleeding-heart liberals, who talk about how important it is to educate our children, can turn around, and in the same breath, promote killing them in abortion clinics?

The average politician today is a low-down, sorry, tax-raising, fag-loving, baby-killing devil. That is exactly right!  They might get some heathen’s vote because of it but they’re selling this country down the river.  But brethren, the Bible is still true.  Queers are still going to Hell and abortion is still murder in the eyes of God.  I don’t care whether you call it an embryo or a fetus, it is a baby!   And God hates “hands that shed innocent blood.”  (Prov 6:17)

17 Then was fulfilled that which was spoken by Jeremy[13] the prophet, saying,

18 In Rama was there a voice heard, lamentation, and weeping, and great mourning, Rachel weeping for her children, and would not be comforted, because they are not.[14]

Herod had a warped sense of mercy.  It probably made him feel better that he didn’t have anyone killed who was over a certain age.  Rachel is mentioned because she was buried in Ephrath which is Bethlehem[15].  Thus Micah refers to it as Bethlehem Ephratah.[16]

19 But when Herod was dead, behold, an angel of the Lord appeareth in a dream to Joseph in Egypt,

Herod was a formidable foe, but now “Herod was dead.”  Mary’s husband Joseph has a lot of similarities with the Joseph of Genesis.  Both had dreams (Gen 37:5) and both had a daddy named “Jacob” (Matt 1:16).

20 Saying, Arise, and take the young child and his mother, and go into the land of Israel: for they are dead which sought the young child’s life.

21 And he arose, and took the young child and his mother, and came into the land of Israel.

22 But when he heard that Archelaus did reign in Judaea in the room of his father Herod, he was afraid to go thither: notwithstanding, being warned of God in a dream, he turned aside into the parts of Galilee:

23 And he came and dwelt in a city called Nazareth: that it might be fulfilled which was spoken by the prophets, He shall be called a Nazarene.

Notice, Jesus was a Nazarene and not a Nazarite.  This difference is important to point out when dealing with the subject of long hair.[17]


[1] H.A. Ironside says these men had probably read the LXX.  (See comment and footnote under 12:21)

[2] “The watchmen that go about the city found me: to whom I said, Saw ye him whom my soul loveth?” (Song 3:3)

[3] Thus begins the first “Star Trek.”

[4] When you’re dealing with time before Christ (B.C.) the years go down.

[5] “But thou, Bethlehem Ephratah, though thou be little among the thousands of Judah, yet out of thee shall he come forth unto me that is to be ruler in Israel; whose goings forth have been from of old, from everlasting.”  (Mic 5:2)

[6] “Ecumenical” Relating to, involving, or promoting the unity of different Christian churches and groups (often at the expense of Bible doctrine).

[7] Secretly

[8] The word “politics” comes from poli (many) and tics (blood sucking creatures).

[9] “O come, let us worship and bow down: let us kneel before the LORD our maker.” (Psalm 95:6)

[10] “When Israel was a child, then I loved him, and called my son out of Egypt.” (Ho 11:1)

[11] Note:  sometimes wise men mock public figures.

[12] Note:  Herod was “exceeding wroth” liberals can’t stand to have their authority questioned.

[13] See the comment on Matthew 27:10

[14] (Jer 31:15)

[15] (Gen 35:19)

[16] “But thou, Bethlehem Ephratah, though thou be little among the thousands of Judah, yet out of thee shall he come forth unto me that is to be ruler in Israel; whose goings forth have been from of old, from everlasting.”  (Mic 5:2)

[17] “Doth not even nature itself teach you, that, if a man have long hair, it is a shame unto him?” (1Cor 11:14)

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August 5, 2010 - Posted by | Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

2 Comments »

  1. hellooo, really loving this post!

    Comment by Dexter Kliewer | March 4, 2011 | Reply

  2. Wassup, really liking this blog!

    Comment by Cathy Gama | March 4, 2011 | Reply


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